RADIOLOGY

About RADIOLOGY

Diagnostic radiology helps health care providers see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation of these images are called diagnostic radiologists. Using the diagnostic images, the radiologist or other physicians can often:

  • Diagnose the cause of your symptoms
  • Monitor how well your body is responding to a treatment you are receiving for your disease or condition
  • Screen for different illnesses, such as breast cancer, colon cancer, or heart disease

Ultrasound

A head ultrasound uses sound waves to make images of the brain. An ultrasound machine sends sound waves into the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal structure of the brain, including the ventricles (the fluid-filled cavities in the brain) and the blood vessels.

A breast ultrasound is most often done to find out if a problem found by a mammogram or physical exam of the breast may be a cyst filled with fluid or a solid tumor. Breast ultrasound is not usually done to screen for breast cancer.

A carotid ultrasound is performed to test for narrowed carotid arteries, which increase the risk of stroke. Carotid arteries are usually narrowed by a buildup of plaque — made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium and other substances that circulate in the bloodstream.

The superficial femoral artery plays a crucial role in delivering oxygenated blood to the entire lower leg. Before entering the adductor canal, it gives off the descending genicular artery that supplies part of the knee

xray

Chest x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the chest. It is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to help diagnose shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury.

This view should demonstrate the bones and soft tissue of hand including the carpals, metacarpals, phalanges. No rotation of the hand should be observed.

A CT scan uses computers and rotating X-ray machines to create cross-sectional images of the body. These images provide more detailed information than typical X-ray images. They can show the soft tissues, blood vessels, and bones in various parts of the body.

A CT scan may be used to visualize the:

  • head
  • shoulders
  • spine
  • heart
  • abdomen
  • knee
  • chest

A CT of the brain is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses special X-rays measurements to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the brain. Brain CT scans can provide more detailed information about brain tissue and brain structures than standard X-rays of the head, thus providing more data related to injuries and/or diseases of the brain

Doctor

Prof. Tameem Akhtar

OPD Days & Timings

Mon to Sat 09:00 am to 05:00 pm